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From: yair davidi (britam@netvision.net.il)
To:      heb_roots_chr@hebroots.org
Subject:  The Return of the Lost Tribes - Moses Nachmanides


From Eddie:

    The following article comes from a recent edition of the Brit-Am
(Covenant - People) magazine by an Orthodox Jew who lives in
Jerusalem named Yair Davidy.  Information about how to subscribe to
this magazine is given at the end of this article and also at his
webpage.

    Yair Davidy has written several books on the Ten Lost Tribes. He
is probably the most recognizable ORTHODOX JEWISH authority on the
research regarding the Ten Lost Tribes from an ORTHODOX JEWISH
perspective.

   You are encourage to send an e-mail to Yair Davidy at:
(britam@netvision.net.il) and subscribe to his magazine and / or buy
his books and discover his research on the subject of the Ten Lost
Tribes from Talmudic and historical sources. He has a webpage located
at:

   http://www.geocities.com/Eureka/Meeting/6405/tribesman.html

   Eddie Chumney

************************************************************************

THE LAST DAYS AND THE RETURN OF THE LOST TRIBES

                 What Does the Bible Say?
                                   by
Nachmanides (Moshe ben Nachman. 1194-1270)

                        (Article 1 of 2)


      Moshe ben Nachman ("Nachmanides" in Hebrew "Ramban", 1194-1270) was
born in Gerona, Catalonia, Spain. By profession he was a doctor. He
participated in a Disputation (under the direction of King James of
Aragon) which he won. King James awarded him a handsome cash prize but
the Church was angered so he had to flee. He went to the Land of
Israel and worked to re-establish the Jewish settlement there. His
synagogue may still be seen in the Old City of Jerusalem. He had
become the foremost rabbinical authority in his time. He is famous for
his commentary on the Torah, for his Talmudic Commentary, and for his
legal opinions. He is also revered as a philosopher and deep spiritual
mystic. After Rashi his commentary on the Torah is probably in our
time the most highly revered and respected amongst Rabbinical
scholars. He stated that in our own time we have a legally binding
obligation to conquer the Land of Israel and that it is forbidden to
surrender any part of it to foreigner. This opinion of Nachmanides is
frequently referred to today by some religious and patriotic leaders
of the Jewish people especially those in the State of Israel. The
style of expression that Nachmanides used reflected a verbatim
knowledge of the Hebrew Bible and related sources. His writings are a
literary work of art. The translation we have produced below may not
have done it justice but word for word it is fairly reliable. In the
extract below Nachmanides discusses the prophetical sections of the
Books of Deuteronomy and Isaiah. He holds that two separate Exiles
were described in detail in these prophecies: One concerned the Exile
to Babylon from which the Jews (of Judah and Benjamin) returned and
the other concerned this present Exile that has not yet finished. This
present Exile also entails that of the Lost Ten Tribes who are still
in Exile and who will return. Nachmanides proves this point at some
length from Biblical passages. He says that the Lost Ten Tribes are in
Tserefath (Gaul and its region) "in the far northern extremities." On
some points Nachmanides opinions do not correspond with our own but
his article is invaluable. It resolves many frequently asked questions
concerning the Lost Ten Tribes and other matters and is the work of a
scholar whose and genius whole life was dedicated to questions such as
these. The excerpt below is mainly a straight translation with some
minor adaptions. This translation is fairly literal though a few minor
changes have been introduced for the sake of the modern reader who
perhaps has never encountering this type of literature before now. It
is being presented for the first time. The excerpt contains commentary
on certain Biblical passages. This commentary is of great interest and
most helpful for understanding certain portions of the Bible. It is
not however necessarily in accordance in all its details with the
understanding held by all the other Commentators or with that held by
Brit-Am on some points.

The excerpt is derived from the edition presented by Rabbi Chaim David
Chavel and has been helped by his commentary and citing of sources.
The excerpt has been taken and slightly adapted from the first chapter
of "Sefer HaGulah" ("The Book of Redemption") as presented in "Kitvei
Rabeynu Moshe ben Nachman." (Mossad HaRav Kook), Jerusalem, Israel. 

This is the first of two articles.

In this article Nachmanides examines prophecies in the Bible (mainly
from the Books of Deuteronomy, Isaiah, Jeremiah, and Ezekiel) and
discusses which sections have been fulfilled and which have not. He
also examines which sections applied to the Jews in Second Temple
Times and which applied to all of Israel including the Lost Ten
Tribes.

We must praise God and give thanks to Him with all our heart, our
entire mind, and all our strength and might for our ability to
contemplate his word and to express our thoughts. We have an
obligation to strengthen our loins and concentrate our forces to help
those who are weary of exile and preach to them about the future
redemption. Let us look first into the Torah whose ways are all of
pleasantness, and all her paths are peace (Proverbs 3;17). May He who
gave us the Torah be exalted in the glorious majesty of his kingdom
(Psalm 145;12). May the people who received the Torah exult since "his
reward is with him, and his work before him" (Isaiah 40;10). All those
who are literate should be aware that our Torah is not a jumble of
riddles and prognostications. Moses our teacher alone was the prophet
through whom commandments were given. "These are the commandments
which the LORD commanded Moses for the children of Israel in mount
Sinai" (Leviticus 27;34). No Prophet was allowed to introduce any
changes in these commandments from that time on. Most of the words of
Moses (unlike the other Prophets) were not concerned with future
matters. Though Moses did speak of things that would occur in the
future these were more for the sake of the commandments: They were
meant to warn us what would happen if we disobeyed and to encourage us
with rewards of comfort and benefits for obeying. Everything was on
condition: Life and goodness will be ours if we serve Him; death and
evil will come upon us if we betray Him. Apart from that, the truth is
that in the midst of all the exhortations against transgressing and
the promises of great blessing for obeying given by Moses he let us
know in many places the signs of future events and told us what was
coming. At times this was by way of hint and at other times it was
expressly stated. It says, "When you shall beget children and
children's children and you shall have remained long in the land and
shall corrupt yourselves" (Deuteronomy 4;25). Here the words of
Scripture involve several aspects. The passage contains both a warning
and a prophecy of the future and speaks of things that at all events
will occur. There too a promise and consolation is involved, as it
says, "But if from there you will seek the LORD your God, you will
find him, if you seek him with all your heart and with all your soul"
(Deuteronomy 4;29). In this passage the exile of Judah to Babylon was
spoken of as is hinted at in the Hebrew numerical value of letters
("Gematria" i.e. numerology) in the key word. A person could however
conceivably interpret quite a few verses in a very mistaken manner
using the system of numerology. For this reason some people may choose
to criticize me for relying on numerology. They could say that it
seems to be an empty vanity and a waste of time. Our reply to such
criticism is that in principle the claims against numerology are
correct and that nobody is authorized to make his own calculations and
reach whatever conclusion he likes. Nevertheless there exists a
tradition in the hands of the sages (may their memory be blessed) who
compiled the Talmud that the numerical values of certain words possess
a peculiar significance. These traditions date back to the time of
Moses at Mount Sinai. They were part of the Oral Tradition...


                       THE FUTURE REDEMPTION

      Moses spoke of the future and in some places about things that
surely were to happen unconditionally. In the Book of Deuteronomy it says, "[Deut
30:1] And it shall come to pass, when all these things are come upon
thee, the blessing and the curse, which I have set before thee, and
thou shalt call them to mind among all the nations, whither the LORD
thy God hath driven thee." [Deut 30:2] And shalt return unto the LORD
thy God, and shalt obey his voice according to all that I command thee
this day, thou and thy children, with all thine heart, and with all
thy soul; [Deut 30:3] That then the LORD thy God will turn thy
captivity, and have compassion upon thee, and will return and gather
thee from all the nations, whither the LORD thy God hath scattered
thee. [Deut 30:4] If any of thine be driven out unto the outmost parts
of heaven, from thence will the LORD thy God gather thee, and from
thence will he fetch thee: [Deut 30:5] And the LORD thy God will bring
thee into the land which thy fathers possessed, and thou shalt possess
it; and he will do thee good, and multiply thee above thy fathers.
[Deut 30:6] And the LORD thy God will circumcise thine heart, and the
heart of thy seed, to love the LORD thy God with all thine heart, and
with all thy soul, that thou mayest live.

 "And the LORD shall scatter you among the nations...But if from there
you shall seek the LORD your God, you shall find Him, if you shall seek
him with all your heart and with all your soul" (Deuteronomy 4:27-29).
This passage is referring to our FUTURE redemption. The subject does
NOT concern the Return from Babylon of the Jews for that did not occur
in the LAST DAYS but rather it happened shortly after their time of
Exile. In addition this promise of FUTURE redemption was given to all
of Israel not just to a fifth of them [i.e. not just to the Jews who
comprise only two or three whole tribes and some segments of the
others out of the original twelve or thirteen tribes of Israel]. In
the SECOND Redemption [the first was the Coming out of Egypt] there
only returned a portion of Judah and Benjamin and that from the lowest
elements. Most of the Jews remained in Babylon....

It was promised, "If you be driven into the uttermost parts of
heaven, from there will the LORD your God gather you and from there will he
fetch you" (Deuteronomy 30;4). It also says, "And the LORD your God
will circumcise your heart.." (Deuteronomy 30;4). This means since in
the Latter Days you will agreed in your heart to return unto the LORD
your God (Deuteronomy 30;2) so too will He help and support you. This
is connected to what it says in Ezekiel, "I will take away the stony
heart out of your flesh, and I will give you a heart of flesh"
(Ezekiel 36;26). The whole passage in Deuteronomy is proven to be
concerned with the FUTURE Redemption. We have however stubborn
opponents who do not want to admit that this prophecy is for the
future but rather claim that it is one of the conditional-options in
the Torah: Even from this point of view it must at least be admitted
that it says that the possibility of Redemption is in our hands as
long as we return to God. We have not lost it despite our many sins.
In the course of our years of rebellion the set time of Redemption did
not come. Moses our teacher warned us in the Bible with all kinds of
admonishments and warnings. These exhortations are horrifying in all
their details and designed in every possible way to inspire the terror
and fear of what will come upon us if we do not repent. As terrible as
these threats may be we were never ever cautioned that if we continue
to sin another people [or religion] would replace us or that God would
altogether forget us. The Covenant between us and our God that was
made when we received the Torah was not made under any such condition.
It was rather always contingent on our doing repentance. We were
promised that He would always remember us and receive us with mercy,
"Then will I remember my covenant with Jacob." (Leviticus 26;42).
It says, "When the LORD your God will cut off the nations whose land
the LORD your God gives you" (Deuteronomy 19;1). "And if the LORD your
God will enlarge your border" (Deuteronomy 19;8). It is obvious that
these verses were not spoken on condition that we rebel so that they
would not be fulfilled on account of our sins. The fulfillment of
these verses was not made conditional on our keeping all of the
commandments since this would mean that these words were spoken
superfluously. Rather it must be understood that this section was
prophetical. Moses knew  (God told him) that we were destined to cross
the Jordan. He also knew that we would cut off the pagans before us
and expand our borders so that we would add another three cities of
refuge onto the three that already existed. [The separation of an
another three cities in addition to the six that are already separated
is also implied]. Our merits however were not enough to enable us to
expand our border enough to add another three cities [making nine
instead of six altogether]. Neither did we reach the level where we
were able to keep all the commandments and go in the ways of God being
sure of never again transgressing. We are commanded to keep all the
commandments to love God and to always go in his ways. It is clear
from the Torah and Prophets as well as from common sense that a person
has fee choice. If therefore before being exiled we had acted as we
should have and conquered our nature to never sin then at that time
our border would have been enlarged. This is why the section begins
with "if". At all events the possibility is in our hands of expanding
our border in the future and receiving all the other promised
benefits. It is all connected to our future redemption, the Torah, and
keeping the commandments.

 A strong proof for the redemption being contingent on our deeds is
found at the end of the Torah. "Behold you shall sleep with your
fathers; and this people will rise up and go a whoring after the gods
of the strangers of the land" (Deuteronomy 31; 16) and so on until the
end of the 32nd chapter. It says there, "And it shall come to pass,
when many evils and troubles are befallen them, that this song shall
testify against them as a witness; for it shall not be forgotten out
of the mouths of their seed" [Deut 31:21]. This is a great and mighty
assurance. In this song of Deuteronomy (chapters 31,32) is revealed a
true and faithful witness that we would be saved despite all the
troubles occurring to us that were prophesied in this Exile such as,
"I said, I would scatter them into corners, I would make the
remembrance of them to cease from among men" [Deut 32:26]: Here "I
would scatter them into corners" is hinting at the LOST TEN TRIBES. "I
would make the remembrance of them to cease from among men" refers to
us Jews of the Tribes of Judah and Benjamin who are not at present
remembered in the quorum of nations and are not even considered [in
the eyes of others] a people in our own right. In the end of days,
however, "Rejoice, O ye nations, He will avenge the blood of his
servants, and will render vengeance to his adversaries, and will be
merciful unto his land, and to his people" [Deut 32:43]. This is a
prophecy about the FUTURE. It is not conditional. There is no getting
away from it. It is for the FUTURE. In the Second Temple period we
never saw the fulfillment of the verse Deut 32:43] "Rejoice, O ye
nations," for the sake of Israel. On the country, we saw the nations
mocking them with all kinds of insult and expressions of contempt. As
the Gentiles said about us when we wished to rebuild the Temple and
Jerusalem, "What do these feeble Jews?" (Nehemiah 4;2). At that time
no vengeance was rendered to our adversaries. No mercy was shown unto
his land and to his people. The Divine Presence was not present in the
Second Temple. There was no gift of prophecy revealed there except at
the very beginning, in the cases of Haggai, Zecariah, and Malachi.

                       REDEMPTION STILL TO COME

   The first exile was to Babylon and a set time was attached to it.
This present Exile however lacks a declared termination-date.
Throughout the Torah everything is made dependent on returning and
repenting. There is a promise of Redemption made with the most exalted
of pledges. "And it shall come to pass when all these things come on
you, the blessing and the curse" (Deuteronomy 30;1) and all that
section, where it is assured that God "will multiply you above your
fathers" (Deuteronomy 30;1). Also it was promised that those who
exiled you would be punished: "And the LORD thy God will put all these
curses upon thine enemies, and on them that hate thee, which
persecuted thee (Deuteronomy 30;7). This is as it says, "Hitherto is
the end of the matter" (Daniel 7;28).

Deut 30:1] And it shall come to pass, when all these things are come
upon thee, the blessing and the curse, which I have set before thee,
and thou shalt call them to mind among all the nations, whither the
LORD thy God hath driven thee, [Deut 30:2] And shalt return unto the
LORD thy God, and shalt obey his voice according to all that I command
thee this day, thou and thy children, with all thine heart, and with
all thy soul; [Deut 30:3] That then the LORD thy God will turn thy
captivity, and have compassion upon thee, and will return and gather
thee from all the nations, whither the LORD thy God hath scattered
thee. [Deut 30:4] If any of thine be driven out unto the outmost parts
of heaven, from thence will the LORD thy God gather thee, and from
thence will he fetch thee: [Deut 30:5] And the LORD thy God will bring
thee into the land which thy fathers possessed, and thou shalt possess
it; and he will do thee good, and multiply thee above thy fathers.
[Deut 30:6] And the LORD thy God will circumcise thine heart, and the
heart of thy seed, to love the LORD thy God with all thine heart, and
with all thy soul, that thou mayest live. [Deut 30:7] And the LORD thy
God will put all these curses upon thine enemies, and on them that
hate thee, which persecuted thee. [Deut 30:8] And thou shalt return
and obey the voice of the LORD, and do all his commandments which I
command thee this day. [Deut 30:9] And the LORD thy God will make thee
plenteous in every work of thine hand, in the fruit of thy body, and
in the fruit of thy cattle, and in the fruit of thy land, for good:
for the LORD will again rejoice over thee for good, as he rejoiced
over thy fathers: [Deut 30:10] If thou shalt hearken unto the voice of
the LORD thy God, to keep his commandments and his statutes which are
written in this book of the law, and if thou turn unto the LORD thy
God with all thine heart, and with all thy soul. [Deut 30:11] For this
commandment which I command thee this day, it is not hidden from thee,
neither is it far off. [Deut 30:12] It is not in heaven, that thou
shouldest say, Who shall go up for us to heaven, and bring it unto us,
that we may hear it, and do it? [Deut 30:13] Neither is it beyond the
sea, that thou shouldest say, Who shall go over the sea for us, and
bring it unto us, that we may hear it, and do it? [Deut 30:14] But the
word is very nigh unto thee, in thy mouth, and in thy heart, that thou
mayest do it. [Deut 30:15] See, I have set before thee this day life
and good, and death and evil; [Deut 30:16] In that I command thee this
day to love the LORD thy God, to walk in his ways, and to keep his
commandments and his statutes and his judgments, that thou mayest live
and multiply: and the LORD thy God shall bless thee in the land
whither thou goest to possess it.

This whole section in Deuteronomy is concerned with that aspect of the
covenant that held from the Second Temple Period onwards and not the
First Temple Period which is discussed elsewhere (e.g. Deuteronomy
25:15 on). In this section dealing with the Second Temple Period
onwards really cardinal crimes (such as idolatry, rejection of the
laws, and abrogation of the covenant) are not discussed. These types
of offence were not present in the Second Temple Period. This is as
the sages said (Yoma 9;b), <"Why was the First Temple destroyed?
"-Because of idolatry, severe sexual transgression, and the shedding
of blood. "In The Second Temple however we are well aware that they
occupied themselves with learning the Torah and with acts of kindness.
"Why was it therefore destroyed? "Due to unjustified hatred.>

We are commanded, "And thou shalt return and obey the voice of the
LORD, and do all his commandments which I command thee this day"
(Deuteronomy 30;7)..

So too concerning the warnings it says,
[Deut 28:49] The LORD shall bring a nation against thee from far, from
the end of the earth, as swift as the eagle flieth; a nation whose
tongue thou shalt not understand"; This referred to the people of Rome
who lived far from Israel [in terms of the time] and this was a people
who they did not know, as the warnings said it would be [Deut
28:33,36]. They were not acquainted with Rome due to the great
distance from their land. A distant nation was not recalled in the
First Covenant since they were exiled to Assyria and Babylon that were
relatively close to them and the source of our ancestors was from
there and it was as if they were returning to their place of origin.
It also says, (Deut 28:64): And the LORD shall scatter thee among all
people, from the one end of the earth even unto the other;" and "the
LORD shall bring thee into Egypt again with ships" (Deut 28:68). This
occurred under Titus (who destroyed the Second Temple) when the Romans
filled boats up with Jewish captives as related in Roman records. 

JEWISH CAPTIVES WERE TAKEN TO EGYPT AS PROPHESIED

Josephus also reports that after the fall of the 2nd Temple many
(possibly most - his exact words as translated are unclear) of the
Jewish captives above the age of 17 were sold into Egypt as slaves.
They were sold by the Romans whose symbol was an eagle. After the end
of the Jewish revolt in 135 CE (fall of Betar) a Roman historian,
Munter said: "Captives were sold into slavery in numbers too great to
count. First they were brought to the grand annual market...near
Hebron. Each slave was sold for the price of a horse. Those captives
who were not sold there were brought to the market place in Gazza....
And those who were still not sold there were herded into ships and
were taken to Egypt" see also E. Schwrer, "A History of the Jewish
People," Edinburgh, 1896.

It says too, "The LORD shall bring thee, and thy king which thou shalt
set over thee, unto a nation which neither thou nor thy fathers have
known" [Deut 28:36]. This happened with King Agrippus who was exiled
to Rome towards the end of the Second Temple period. After he went the
Temple was destroyed as recorded in the Book of Yosippon. This is what
it means by saying, "thy king which thou shalt set over thee",
Agrippus was not fit to be king. According to the Torah it was
forbidden for Agrippus to be the monarch but they set him up as one
illegally. You should realize, the Commentators have already discerned
that the Book of Isaiah is divided into three: From the beginning to
the fall of Sancherib which is concerned with consolations in general
as well as the fall of the Assyrian tyrant and the greatness of King
Hezekiah. After that it begins to speak of the Babylon Exile that had
already been decreed. [Isa 39:6] Behold, the days are coming, when all
that is in your house, and that which your fathers have stored up till
this day, shall be carried to Babylon; nothing shall be left, says the
LORD. [Isa 39:7] And some of your own sons, who are born to you, shall
be taken away; and they shall be servants [or "eunuchs"] in the palace
of the king of Babylon." It then begins with consolations, [Isa 40:1]
"Comfort, comfort my people, [Isa 41:25] I stirred up one from the
north, and he has come, [Isa 43:14] "For your sake I will send to
Babylon Isa 45:1] Thus says the LORD to his anointed, to Cyrus, whose
right hand I have grasped, [Isa 48:20] Go forth from Babylon, flee
from Chaldea, [Isa 48:1] Hear this, O house of Jacob who are called by
the name of Israel, and who came forth from the loins of Judah;

 You will not find in these sections any reference to Ephraim and the
Lost Tribes of Israel except for one verse where it mentions "all the seed
of Israel", i.e. [Isa 45:25] "In the LORD shall all the seed of Israel
be justified and shall glory". This means that they shall acknowledge
the justice of their exile and give praise, saying that, We, too,
shall be redeemed. Apart from this verse only Judah is recalled.
Elsewhere however Isaiah does talk about the Ten Tribes: [Isa 49:5]
And now the LORD says, who formed me from the womb to be his servant,
to bring Jacob back to him, and that Israel might be gathered to him,
for I am honored in the eyes of the LORD, and my God has become my
strength  --  [Isa 49:6] Isaiah says: "It is too
light a thing that you should be my servant to raise up the tribes of
Jacob and to restore the preserved of Israel; I will give you as a
light to the nations, that my salvation may reach to the end of the
earth." Isaiah in general prophesied about all Israel. In these
prophecies he speaks of the exiled of the Kingdom of Judah and the
exiled of the Kingdom of Israel meaning the Lost Ten Tribes. Also we
find in Jeremiah [Jer 30:1] The word that came to Jeremiah from the
LORD, saying, [Jer 30:2] Thus speaketh the LORD God of Israel, saying,
Write thee all the words that I have spoken unto thee in a book. In
this place Jeremiah is speaking of the Latter Times. "The fierce anger
of the LORD shall not return, until he hath done it, and until he have
performed the intents of his heart: in the latter days ye shall
consider it" [Jer 30:24]. It also says, [Jer. 31:1] "At the same time,
saith the LORD, will I be the God of all the families of Israel, and
they shall be my people". The Ten Tribes are part of the family of
Israel that is spoken of here. It says expressly in this section that
it is referring to all of Israel including Ephraim: [Jer 30:4] "And
these are the words that the LORD spake concerning Israel and
concerning Judah." This refers to the Lost Tribes represented by
Ephraim meaning those of the former Kingdom of Israel that encompassed
the other tribes who numbered ten in all. The Redemption from Babylon
mentioned by Jeremiah is not referring to the Last Days, as it says,
"in the latter days ye shall consider it" [Jer 30:24]. Also the new
covenant that is to be made with Judah and the Ten Tribes pertains to
the Last Days: "Behold, the days come, saith the LORD, that I will
make a new covenant with the house of Israel, and with the house of
Judah" [Jer 31:31]. Anyone who wishes to be contrary or heretical can
always find reasons to interpret these verses as referring to
something that has already taken place. The only thing is that if
somebody allows himself to admit the truth then the only conclusion
can be that these matters are referring to a future time. The FUTURE
Redemption MUST Include the TEN TRIBES

 In the Prophecy of Ezekiel many of the prognostications confirm the
above point about the Ten Lost Tribes. Ezekiel spoke of the return of
the Jews of Jerusalem and Samaria that represents the Ten Tribes:
[Ezek 16:53] When I shall bring again their captivity, the captivity
of Sodom and her daughters, and the captivity of Samaria and her
daughters, then will I bring again the captivity of thy captives in
the midst of them. The prophet says that the captivity of Sodom (i.e.
Samaria) will be overturned and they shall return. So far their
overturning and ours has been that of exile not of returning. The
prophets says,: "For in mine holy mountain, in the mountain of the
height of Israel, saith the Lord GOD, there shall all the house of
Israel, all of them in the land, serve me: there will I accept them,
and there will I require your offerings, and the firstfruits of your
oblations, with all your holy things" [Ezek 20:40]. Ezekiel repeats
himself on this issue to emphasize and affirm that all of the Tribes
[including the Lost Ten ones of the former northern "Kingdom of
Israel"] are included in his prophecy and that it refers to the
future. Elsewhere he returns to this subject: [Ezek 36:10] And I will
multiply men upon you, all the house of Israel, even all of it: and
the cities shall be inhabited, and the wastes shall be builded: [Ezek
36:8] But ye, O mountains of Israel, ye shall shoot forth your
branches, and yield your fruit to my people of Israel; for they are at
hand to come. This refers to the fact that God will command the hills
to bear fruit when the end-time in which Israel will return to their
land is close. It did not mean that this thing was supposed to happen
close to the time of the prophet.

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